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leadingtone:

An organist from Zürich improvises on an August Förster Quattrochord Superflügel, a piano whose build and sound are every bit as formidable as its name might suggest. Exemplary of the “Gröβer ist besser” attitude prevalent in Nazi Germany, the “super wing’s” massive bulk of 700 kg is nearly thrice that of the comparable Steinway S-155 from the same period, and where the Steinway model allots three strings per key over much of the compass, the Quattrochord of course allots four. Its rich, sonorous tone was intended in part to fill the unprecedentedly large concert halls the Third Reich planned to build in “World Capital Germania.”

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omgthatartifact:

Clavicytherium
Germany, 18th century
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatartifact:

Clavicytherium

Germany, 18th century

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via facepalmmozart-deactivated20140)

Video

Sergey Malov plays Violoncello da spalla. (by teslexstudio)

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fingeringnonsense:

johnhaggerty:

I’ve been listening to Nico Muhly’s Violin Concerto, Seeing is Believing, and now I REALLY want a six string violin! I wish I wasn’t poor :(

Phwoar :D

fingeringnonsense:

johnhaggerty:

I’ve been listening to Nico Muhly’s Violin Concerto, Seeing is Believing, and now I REALLY want a six string violin! I wish I wasn’t poor :(

Phwoar :D

(via )

Link

More “is there a difference between new & old violins” reading.

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A fun read from reddit’s classical music subreddit.

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ebmajor:

Johannes Florenus Guidantus (Italian, 1687–1760)
Viola d’amore, 18th centurySpruce, maple, ebony; 7 15/16 x 22 5/8 in. (20.2 x 57.5 cm)The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Amati Gifts, 2009 (2009.41)
The viola d’amore, or viola “of love,” is a bowed stringed instrument which gained great popularity in the eighteenth century. Much of its history, including the derivation of its name, is unknown. It has many characteristics of the viol family such as a flat back, ribs that are flush with the top and back, and a rosette in addition to sound holes. Yet, like a violin, it is unfretted and held under the chin while played. Violas d’amore typically have seven playing strings, though instruments with other numbers of strings are not unusual. Perhaps the most distinguishable characteristic of the eighteenth-century viola d’amore is the presence of sympathetic strings, which are not played but located behind the bowed strings and vibrate “in sympathy.” The sympathetic strings contribute to produce a tone that is clear and often described as “silvery,” as well as creating a more resonant sound with a longer decay. The viola d’amore was popular with eighteenth-century composers and can be found in the works of J. S. Bach, Vivaldi, Telemann, Haydn, and Locatelli.
This festooned viola d’amore survives in its unaltered, original condition. This example has seven playing strings that are bowed, and behind the tailpiece and fingerboard are seven sympathetic strings that ring “in sympathy” with the bowed strings. Violas d’amore often have carved figural heads, usually with either a blindfold or shut eyes—a reference to the adage “love is blind.”
Detail:

ebmajor:

Johannes Florenus Guidantus (Italian, 1687–1760)

Viola d’amore, 18th century
Spruce, maple, ebony; 7 15/16 x 22 5/8 in. (20.2 x 57.5 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Amati Gifts, 2009 (2009.41)

The viola d’amore, or viola “of love,” is a bowed stringed instrument which gained great popularity in the eighteenth century. Much of its history, including the derivation of its name, is unknown. It has many characteristics of the viol family such as a flat back, ribs that are flush with the top and back, and a rosette in addition to sound holes. Yet, like a violin, it is unfretted and held under the chin while played. Violas d’amore typically have seven playing strings, though instruments with other numbers of strings are not unusual. Perhaps the most distinguishable characteristic of the eighteenth-century viola d’amore is the presence of sympathetic strings, which are not played but located behind the bowed strings and vibrate “in sympathy.” The sympathetic strings contribute to produce a tone that is clear and often described as “silvery,” as well as creating a more resonant sound with a longer decay. The viola d’amore was popular with eighteenth-century composers and can be found in the works of J. S. Bach, Vivaldi, Telemann, Haydn, and Locatelli.

This festooned viola d’amore survives in its unaltered, original condition. This example has seven playing strings that are bowed, and behind the tailpiece and fingerboard are seven sympathetic strings that ring “in sympathy” with the bowed strings. Violas d’amore often have carved figural heads, usually with either a blindfold or shut eyes—a reference to the adage “love is blind.”

Detail:

(Source: artemisdreaming)